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American Revolution: Domino Effect
Category: Social Studies
Tags: american revolution causes of the american revolution american revolution timeline

Show how one thing led to another with these free resources exploring the causes of the American Revolution: 

Differing Points of View - Visit Project Look Sharp for an elementary teaching kit on the Causes of the American Revolution. For each cause, there's a downloadable teacher's guide and student worksheet, plus a list of supplementary resources. The materials include accounts of incidents from different viewpoints -- for example, a description of the Boston Massacre from both the colonist and British perspectives. Other lessons include analyzing a Phyllis Wheatley poem, and comparing two 18th century "George" portraits (George Washington and King George III).

Chain Reaction: Make various mini lapbooks and foldables for each cause using this Hands-On-History download. Includes instructions for: a Q & A flip book on taxes; Boston Tea Party step book; mini book of Paul Revere's ride; and other projects.

  

Download a Grade 4 reader on the American Revolution, with nine chapters. Download the accompanying Activity Book, with review questions, vocabulary, grammar, and writing activities.

                                

More American Revolution Resources:

Animated Battles:

Interactive Game:

 



History with Primary Sources
Category: Social Studies
Tags: primary sources primary source documents

Incorporating primary source analysis into your history studies is easier than ever these days due to a number of free sites with ready-made lessons and activities. Here are several for American history:

Write an Essay: At Zoom in, individual lessons guide learners in the study of different types of primary sources, such as speeches, letters, political cartoons, oral histories, audio recordings, and photographs. After weighing the evidence and different perspectives, students write an explanatory or argumentative essay. (One example: the benefits and disadvantages for young women working in America’s first factores). The lessons cover all the major eras of U.S. history.

 

Another site that presents conflicting accounts for debate, and prompts learners to respond with an essay, is Historical Thinking Matters.

 

Investigate a Historical Scene: Explore various case files to draw conclusions about historical events. What caused the Jamestown colony to fail? Who was responsible for the Boston Massacre? What was it like for children living during the Civil War? Through these and other investigations at Historical Scene Investigation, students become history detectives by analyzing evidence, searching for clues, and finally cracking the case.

 

Solve a History Mystery: At The Price of Freedom: Americans at War, explore the wars Americans have fought through primary sources. You can also play an interactive Who Am I game that presents you with a mystery character you identify using as clues a quotation and objects associated with that character.

 

 

Sharpen Critical Thinking with Interactives: Annenberg Learner presents a series of primary source-based interactives that target such critical thinking skills as analysis, and development of a thesis. The site also features an American History Course organized into 22 units, with videos, text, questions and activities. Each unit presents several broad themes that can be studied, and also includes associated primary documents, like old photographs and political cartoons, plus assignments to go along with them.

 

Use Guided Analysis Worksheets: These worksheets, developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration, provide questions for examining:

Visit the Library of Congress site for addtional primary source study guides.

Related Post: Learning History Through Role-Playing

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