Additional Posts: Categories

Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

Chaotic Bliss Homeschooling

Math
High School Math Resource Roundup
Category: Math
Tags: geometry online high school geometry geometry online book algebra calculus

The following is a list of full math courses, online and free: 

Beginning and Intermediate Algebratextbook, workbook and solutions manual; there are also videos by topic

Algebra 1SAS Curriculum Pathways

Beginning AlgebraSaylor Academy.

Algebra and GeometryHippocampus

Algebra 1 Modules: From NY State Education Dept.

Algebra 1 OnlineHenrico County Public Schools

Algebra 2 OnlineHenrico County Public Schools

Geometry OnlineHenrico County Public Schools

Algebra 1, 2, GeometryMath Planet

Algebra 1 and 2Open High School of Utah

Calculus 1: Mooculus.

Georgia Virtual LearningThis site has a number of online high school math courses that can be accessed for free.

Curriki Courses: 

Algebra 1: This is a full course, broken into modules, so you can use it in its entirety, or just the parts you want. The course includes lesson plans, with links to related Khan Academy videos, worksheets and assessments with their answer keys, and each unit ends with a real-world project.

GeometryThe course is modular, so it can be used to supplement an existing Geometry program, or serve as the main curriculum. It's project-based, emphasizing real-world examples, such as using Geometry to create architectural designs for an apartment or house, or designing a floor plan that maximizes open space and natural light.

CalculusCovers Limits & Continuity, Derivatives, Applications of Derivatives, Integrals, and Applications of Integrals. Includes links to workbooks and videos.

Math Video Library: Visit Mathispower4u.com for video tutorials in Algebra 1 and 2, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Calculus.

(If you know of any other free math courses, please list in the comment section).



Fractions, Decimals, Percents, Ratios, Proportions
Category: Math
Tags: multiplying fractions how to multiply fractions multiplying fractions with whole numbers multiplying fractions worksheets

Several years ago, when my son and I were working on multiplying fractions, we were doing some work with multiplying a whole number by a fraction, specifically a proper fraction, where the numerator is less than the denominator. The example was 5/8 x 12, and the focus of the lesson was supposed to be that in order to multiply a fraction and a whole number, you change the whole number into its equivalent improper fraction, in this case, 12/1, then solve. (Cross cancel, multiply the numerators, multiply the denominators, get your answer).

Okay, so he had no problems with the process. What did bother him was when he got the answer and saw that it was less than what he started with.  At first, this didn’t make sense to him because, as he put it, “Doesn’t multiplication mean more?” 

So we talked about it, and with a little more contemplation:  

  • he understood that, yes, when you multiply whole numbers, you get more (except when one of the factors is 1 or 0
  • he remembered that when you multiply by 1 (which is like multiplying by a fraction with the same numerator and denominator) the number stays the same
  • by Jove, he then realized that when you multiply by a fraction that’s less than 1, you’re taking less than 1 of what you started with, so the answer is smaller.
  • he then extended the thinking a bit more by relating that when you multiply by an improper fraction (where the numerator is bigger than the denominator) you’re multiplying by more than 1, so the answer would be bigger

Now, I realize this example demonstrates a rudimentary understanding of numbers, but, to me, this also illustrates a problem I think kids can run into when it comes to learning math: the difference between knowing how to perform the steps of a particular process versus understanding why an answer does or does not make sense. Sometimes, we can learn a process mechanically without thinking about what we're doing in concrete terms. Maybe the pondering comes later – or maybe it never comes at all.

I suspect this may be one reason why kids that do great in basic math and pre-algebra seemingly hit a brick wall when they get to Algebra.  Could it be because when studying Algebra, you may learn to mechanically follow steps to solve complex equations without really comprehending the underlying logic? Or maybe some kids never get a good enough grasp of the basics to sufficiently tackle “higher math?” 

I’m not sure where the breakdown occurs, but I do know that some people have a great facility with numbers (I am, unfortunately, not one of these people), while others may struggle all their lives with math, and others are somewhere in between. Is the facility with numbers from having been taught well, a result of some innate trait, a combination?  How do you determine if your child has a sufficient understanding of math principles? Do you assess with worksheets and tests or use another method? Please leave a comment. And, if you need some free resources for learning fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, take a look at these:

MathMammoth: videos and worksheets on a variety of fraction topics

Fraction Video Tutorialson reading, writing and reducing fractions

Math Games, Videos, Worksheetson fractions, decimals, and percentages

Dining OutHere are free activities you can use for a co-op or group. Get the kids working with fractions, decimals and percents by figuring tax, tips and discounts when ordering food at restaurants.

Fraction Worksheets and Printables

Math AnticsFree videos with access to some free worsheets.

Yummy Math:  This site stands out from many on the Web, in that it focuses on relating math to real life. There’s more emphasis on concepts and critical thinking than on memorization of steps. For more on the YummyMath philosophy, read this post.

Math SnacksShort animations and games for teaching math concepts in grades 3 - 8. Includes accompanying worksheets (with answer keys).

And for additional math resources, visit our math page.

 

 

Pin It

 

Mid-Summer Vacation Break
Category: Math
Tags: algebra. high school math geometry algebra 2 help

Hope you are having a swell summer. After a grueling week in Orlando, I'm happy to get back to the more relaxing (and definitely less taxing) resource planning for the upcoming school year. 

For those of you also in planning mode, here are some high school materials  you may find useful: 

Prentice Hall Algebra 2: So far, I've homeschooled two children at the high school level, and have used a variety of math resource types, including textbook-based (with a hodgepodge of videos not specifically correlated to the text); CD-ROM-based lessons with textbook from a homeschool academy; and totally online courses with no textbook at all. I have found that my high schoolers, although typical "cyber-generation," actually prefer hard-copy when it comes to certain things, math being one of them. So, I'm thinking of using the Prentice Hall Algebra 2 textbook, which appears comprehensive, and has a companion website with projects and real-world applications, and computer-scored lesson quiz.zes, and chapter tests. In addition, here are three sites with video lessons that correlate specifically to each chapter of the Prentice Hall text.

Other Math Textbook/Video Correlations: If you are looking for teaching videos related to specific textbooks for other maths, try HippoCampus. The site has also just added an Art of Problem Solving collection with videos that break down how to solve problems.

Saylor's K-12 Section: Not sure if I mentioned this before, but Saylor.org, which has hundreds of free, online, self-paced college-level courses, also offers some middle- and high-school courses. Currently, there are 9 of them in the areas of English Language Arts, high school math, and two "electives" (one on the Common Core and one on SAT prep).

Enjoy your summer.

RSS

New Members
HillsFamily4
Joined: Sep 16th
redneckinn
Joined: Jul 16th
Mom Of Many
Joined: Jul 15th
chaosmom
Joined: Jul 8th
Grab Our Button
unSocialized