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Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

Chaotic Bliss Homeschooling

Social Studies
Renaissance Artists
Category: Social Studies
Tags: renaissance art italian renaissance renaissance paintings da vinci raphael donatello michaelangelo

These materials for teaching about Renaissance artists can be used for several grade levels as a supplement to your own materials:

The following flipbook is a sample of a reader that highlights major artists of the Renaissance. Download the full PDF reader and workbook here

Compare/Contrast Two Works of Art: Provides a chart with suggested things to look for, such as elements of art present in the work and mood of the work. Observations can be turned into short essays.

Learn About Linear Perspective: Use a drawing interactive to examine three paintings to look for perspective lines, vanishing point, and horizon line. Then click an empty room to try to apply the rules of perspective.

Additional Renaissance lesson plans can be found at the Renaissance Connection.

Visit Leonardo’s Workshop: Learn about simple machines; play a game in which you try to identify the machines in Leonardo’s sketches; make your own sketches of gadgets to show how they work. Learn more about the artist at Exploring Leonardo.

Virtual Sistene Chapel: Fly around, zoom in and out.

Da Vinci and the Code He Lived By (Free Study Guide): 

Easy How to Draw a Ninja Turtle Face

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/manuelsagra/383825655/


Homeschooling the Middle & High School Years

Reviewing Our Rights
Category: Social Studies
Tags: judicial branch constitutional rights bill of rights the amendments civics

While continuing our studies of the amendments and rights of Americans, I came across a useful site, focusing on the Judicial Branch, called Courts in the Classroom. A collaboration of the Judicial Branch of California and the Constitutional Rights Foundation, the site features a series of animated comic slideshows that help kids understand such topics as free speech; what due process means; what judges and courts do; checks and balances, privacy issues (search and seizure), and explanations of several Supreme Court landmark cases. Below each slideshow is a glossary section with words and definitions pertaining to the topic you're watching.

It's been interesting reviewing these with my kids, and it's led to some good discussions. Could make a good resource for a homeschool civics or debate co-op class.


Federal Reserve Free Teaching Kit
Category: Social Studies
Tags: federal reserve money banking

The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago is offering a free teaching kit that explains how the Fed works. Intended for high school age, the kit includes a curriculum guide, a movie, presentation on a CD, plus two bags of "Fed Shreds" to facilitate discussions about money supply and what happens to old money. All you have to provide is your shipping address. Postage is free. 

Another resource on the Federal Reserve is the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia's Money in Motion. The free exhibit features various electronic stations that teach about the workings of the Fed and other topics, such as the history of money, inflation, how checks are processed, and identity theft. (Just visited the exhibit this past summer when we were in Philadelphia, and it was pretty neat). If you can't get to the exhibit in person, you can take the online virtual tour, which allows you to visit each station from your computer. The Fed of Philadelphia site also has free, K-12 lesson plans on economics and personal finance.



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